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dc.contributor.authorCrediford, John Williamen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-20T15:07:22Z
dc.date.available2012-11-20T15:07:22Z
dc.date.issued1940en_US
dc.date.submitted1940en_US
dc.identifier.otherb1477927en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2144/4422
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Boston University, 1940en_US
dc.description.abstractChapter I, Introduction, began with the following quotation: "I take up a volume of Dr. Smollett, or a volume of the Spectator, and say that fiction carries a greater amount of truth in solution than the volume which purports to be all true. Out of the fictitious book I get the expression of the life of the time; of the manners, of the movement, the dress, the pleasures, the laughter, the ridicules of society--the old times live again, and I travel in the old country of England. Can the heaviest historian do more for me?" This thesis was written with this quotation in mind throughout. The chapter headings were selected from four of the list mentioned by Thackerary that were paramount in Smollett. They were "of the life of the times," "of the manners, "of the movement," and "of the pleasures." Each quotation taken from Smollett to show these was supported by a similar selection from a contemporary eighteenth century writer wherever possible. Chapter I closed with a statement to the effect that usually it was the situation not the facts pertaining to the social life that were exaggerated by Smollett.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictionsen_US
dc.titleLife in eighteenth century England as reflected in the novels of Dr. Tobias George Smollet, 1721-1771en_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelmasters
etd.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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