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dc.creatorLayzer, Kate
dc.date2000-01-01
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-21T19:53:19Z
dc.date.available2012-08-21T19:53:19Z
dc.date.issued2012-08-21
dc.identifierhttp://digilib.bu.edu/journals/ojs/index.php/jfse/article/view/80
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2144/3974
dc.descriptionMichael Polanyi has argued that tacit knowing—the consolidation and integration of earlier achievements from which to launch further advances— plays an essential role in evolution. Tacit knowledge is often transmitted by observation and imitation—what anthropologist Rene Girard calls mimesis. Girard suggests that this mimetic tendency has had both beneficial and negative effects: violent outbreaks of mimetic rivalry among early hominids necessitated the development of ritual controls, representing the beginning of culture. Beneath all culture, a universal scapegoating mechanism—humankind\'s \"original sin\"—remains hidden. Jewish and Christian scriptures present a countervailing cultural force, challenging human beings to develop in directions not dependent on rivalry and violence.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherBoston Theological Institute
dc.relationhttp://digilib.bu.edu/journals/ojs/index.php/jfse/article/view/80/80
dc.sourceJournal of Faith and Science Exchange; Journal of Faith and Science Exchange, Vol. 4
dc.titleProgress Toward an Unthinkable Consummation: Sin and the Evolution of Human Consciousnessen_US
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion


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