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dc.contributor.authorShriner, Danielen_US
dc.contributor.authorAdeyemo, Adebowaleen_US
dc.contributor.authorGerry, Norman P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHerbert, Alanen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Guanjieen_US
dc.contributor.authorDoumatey, Ayoen_US
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Hanxiaen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Jieen_US
dc.contributor.authorChristman, Michael F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRotimi, Charles N.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T22:27:20Z
dc.date.available2012-01-11T22:27:20Z
dc.date.issued2009-12-22en_US
dc.identifier.citationShriner, Daniel, Adebowale Adeyemo, Norman P. Gerry, Alan Herbert, Guanjie Chen, Ayo Doumatey, Hanxia Huang, Jie Zhou, Michael F. Christman, Charles N. Rotimi. "Transferability and Fine-Mapping of Genome-Wide Associated Loci for Adult Height across Human Populations" PLoS ONE 4(12): e8398. (2009)en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2144/3300
dc.description.abstractHuman height is the prototypical polygenic quantitative trait. Recently, several genetic variants influencing adult height were identified, primarily in individuals of East Asian (Chinese Han or Korean) or European ancestry. Here, we examined 152 genetic variants representing 107 independent loci previously associated with adult height for transferability in a well-powered sample of 1,016 unrelated African Americans. When we tested just the reported variants originally identified as associated with adult height in individuals of East Asian or European ancestry, only 8.3% of these loci transferred (p-values=0.05 under an additive genetic model with directionally consistent effects) to our African American sample. However, when we comprehensively evaluated all HapMap variants in linkage disequilibrium (r2=0.3) with the reported variants, the transferability rate increased to 54.1%. The transferability rate was 70.8% for associations originally reported as genome-wide significant and 38.0% for associations originally reported as suggestive. An additional 23 loci were significantly associated but failed to transfer because of directionally inconsistent effects. Six loci were associated with adult height in all three groups. Using differences in linkage disequilibrium patterns between HapMap CEU or CHB reference data and our African American sample, we fine-mapped these six loci, improving both the localization and the annotation of these transferable associations.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institutes of Health (S06GM008016-320107, S06GM008016-380111, 2M01RR010284, Z01HG200362); Center for Research on Genomics and Global Health (Intramural Research Program); National Human Genome Research Instituteen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_US
dc.rightsThis is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Public Domain declaration which stipulates that, once placed in the public domain, this work may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone for any lawful purpose.en_US
dc.titleTransferability and Fine-Mapping of Genome-Wide Associated Loci for Adult Height across Human Populationsen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0008398en_US
dc.identifier.pubmedid20027299en_US
dc.identifier.pmcid2792725en_US


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