Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLarson, Bruce A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFox, Matthew P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRosen, Sydneyen_US
dc.contributor.authorBii, Margreten_US
dc.contributor.authorSigei, Carolyneen_US
dc.contributor.authorShaffer, Douglasen_US
dc.contributor.authorSawe, Fredricken_US
dc.contributor.authorMcCoy, Kellyen_US
dc.contributor.authorWasunna, Moniqueen_US
dc.contributor.authorSimon, Jonathan L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T21:40:47Z
dc.date.available2012-01-11T21:40:47Z
dc.date.copyright2009
dc.date.issued2009-7-15
dc.identifier.citationLarson, Bruce A, Matthew P Fox, Sydney Rosen, Margret Bii, Carolyne Sigei, Douglas Shaffer, Fredrick Sawe, Kelly McCoy, Monique Wasunna, Jonathan L Simon. "Do the socioeconomic impacts of antiretroviral therapy vary by gender? A longitudinal study of Kenyan agricultural worker employment outcomes" BMC Public Health 9:240. (2009)
dc.identifier.issn1471-2458
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2144/3232
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND. As access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) has grown in Africa, attention has turned to evaluating the socio-economic impacts of ART. One key issue is the extent to which improvements in health resulting from ART allows individuals to return to work and earn income. Improvements in health from ART may also be associated with reduced impaired presenteeism, which is the loss of productivity when an ill or disabled individual attends work but accomplishes less at his or her usual tasks or shifts to other, possibly less valuable, tasks. METHODS. Longitudinal data for this analysis come from company payroll records for 97 HIV-infected tea estate workers (the index group, 56 women, 41 men) and a comparison group of all workers assigned to the same work teams (n = 2485, 1691 men, 794 women) for a 37-month period covering two years before and one year after initiating ART. We used nearest neighbour matching methods to estimate the impacts of HIV/AIDS and ART on three monthly employment outcomes for tea estate workers in Kenya – days plucking tea, days assigned to non-plucking assignments, and kilograms harvested when plucking. RESULTS. The female index group worked 30% fewer days plucking tea monthly than the matched female comparison group during the final 9 months pre-ART. They also worked 87% more days on non-plucking assignments. While the monthly gap between the two groups narrowed after beginning ART, the female index group worked 30% fewer days plucking tea and about 100% more days on non-plucking tasks than the comparison group after one year on ART. The male index group was able to maintain a similar pattern of work as their comparison group except during the initial five months on therapy. CONCLUSION. Significant impaired presenteeism continued to exist among the female index group after one year on ART. Future research needs to explore further the socio-economic implications of HIV-infected female workers on ART being less productive than the general female workforce over sustained periods of time.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen_US
dc.rightsCopyright 2009 Larson et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0
dc.titleDo the Socioeconomic Impacts of Antiretroviral Therapy Vary by Gender? A Longitudinal Study of Kenyan Agricultural Worker Employment Outcomesen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2458-9-240
dc.identifier.pubmedid19604381
dc.identifier.pmcid2717954


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Copyright 2009 Larson et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright 2009 Larson et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.